About: Ideas

Guiding Principles

  • Learning and change happen in a space that is safe and challenging, where people can speak honestly, accept each other’s learning curve, and recognize that no one is the expert.
  • It is important to understand the process of self-reflection and be honest about our own biases.
  • We are all individuals AND members of different identity groups, both of which influence our perspectives and life experiences.
  • The opportunity gap is real, and through intentional actions and relationship building it can be narrowed.
  • In a supportive environment all students can experience academic and social success.
  • It is essential to use Multicultural, Culturally Relevant and Anti-racist teaching practices that affirm the cultures of all students in order to foster academic and social success.
  • Allies need allies to be effective on the challenging “journey” of being anti-racist educators.
  • Teaching and learning are not neutral acts.

History of IDEAS

The Long History of EMI Merging into IDEAS

1985 – 1986

Initial meetings between the METCO Directors Association and Dr. Jeff Howard of the Efficacy Institute are held to discuss ways to improve the academic achievement of African American students enrolled in the METCO program.

1986 – 1987

METCO directors formulate strategies for implementing Howard’s work in several METCO districts. Preliminary introductions of essential “efficacy” concepts are introduced within a small number of METCO districts.

1987 – 1988

Dr. Howard serves as keynote to the METCO Directors’ Fourth Annual Spring Conference, and returns in July to meet with Directors and School Superintendents about ways to implement “efficacy” training in schools. 

Seven Superintendents from Newton, Concord, Lincoln, Sudbury, Wayland, Needham and Wellesley collaborate with Dr. Howard to create the Eastern Massachusetts Initiative (EMI) to address the achievement gaps of Boston resident students in the suburban schools. These seven superintendents are: Tom Scott (Concord), Greg Ciardi (Lincoln), Fred Tirell (Needham), Irwin Blumer (Newton), Henry DeRusha (Sudbury), Bill Zimmerman (Wayland), Karla Baehr DeLetis (Wellesley) – chair. The METCO coordinators are: Dana Johnson (CCHS/Concord), Carroll Blake (Lincoln), Val Davis (Needham), Wanda Speede-Franklin (Newton), Maxine Yarbrough (Sudbury), Manuel Fernandez (Wayland), Dionne McLaughlin (Wellesley). 

The Efficacy model is adopted as the knowledge base to be shared and disseminated within the seven member districts.

1988 – 1989

EMI communities begin teacher training and professional development using the Efficacy instructors, speakers, and consultants. EMI communities contract separately with Howard’s group and continue to promote the model within their schools. EMI communities join several school systems nationally in Atlanta, New York, and Detroit, in pursuing the “efficacy” challenge.

1989 – 1990

Superintendents and METCO directors begin to meet bimonthly to discuss progress, difficulties, and successes in implementation. Concern surfaces over differences between the Efficacy model and Skillful Teacher training which is being used/required in the EMI districts as well. An effort is made to meld the two training programs with Jonathan Saphier and Jeff Howard agreeing to collaborate on training.

1990 – 1991

METCO directors express concern that the Efficacy model of training does not take into account the importance of racial identity development and its influence on academic achievement. Disagreements arise over the effectiveness of the hybrid Howard-Saphier model. The model, it is suggested, does not fully address how racism and legacies of racism in the United States shape student achievement. Critics contend the “efficacy” training is “form without substance” and “technique without understanding.” METCO directors argue about the importance of racial identity as the single most important factor in determining how teachers and students of color interact and negotiate schools. 

At a meeting with METCO directors in Hingham, Howard and the Directors split over this question. Howard contends that “efficacy” principles are not inherently tied to race and the EMI districts should continue to focus on efficacy as their first priority.

1991 – 1992

Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum, Mt. Holyoke professor of psychology, publish studies on racial identity formation in the Harvard Educational Review. METCO directors meet Dr. Tatum at a Wellesley conference and invite her to speak to teachers within EMI Communities. Consensus emerges that a new model for teacher training and professional develop is now warranted.

1992 – 1993

EMI superintendents and directors begin the process of creating a new professional development program involving both Beverly Daniel Tatum and John Saphier.

1993 – 1994

EMI presents its first graduate level course “Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for all Students” at Wellesley high school to teachers and administrators. The course is 54 hours long and lasts the entire school year. It is a synthesis of setting expectations, racial identity formation, the history of racism, organizational behavior, the history of intelligence, and school culture. 

It is offered for graduate credit through Fitchburg State College. The following people are enrolled: (Concord) Sharon Moss, Dana Johnson, Cindy Aguilar; (Lincoln) Carroll Blake, Anne Faherty, Amy Hood, Ann Colligan, David Joseph; (Needham) Val Davis, Roberta Richard, Helen Saga, Peg Mongiello; (Newton) Hank Van Putten, Maxine Rosenberg, Laurie Schoelfer, Richard Ballou, George Swift, Rob Stark, Anne Crosby, Paula Diggs; (Sudbury) Bev Hollis, Fred Cross, Naomi Fruitt, Mary Mahoney, Carol Gignoux; (Wayland) Pat Scully, Dan Frio, Aaron Kelton, Christine Trufant, Maureen Devlin; (Wellesley) Brooks Goddard, Eric Cox, Maris Bowens, Peter Mitchell, David Snyder.

1994 – 1995

Tatum and Saphier begin the process of training additional instructors who can disseminate the course to wider audiences. EMI superintendents agree to subsidize the course financially; each district contributing toward payment of the course instructors. Four interns are selected (Carroll Blake, Ann Colligan, Naomi Fruitt, Hank Van Putten) to observe Tatum and Saphier teach the Fall course. The following people are enrolled in the course: Claudia Fox Tree, Paula Martin NAMES? This course lasts only 36 hours. It is the only course taught this year as new instructors are trained. It is video-recorded on VCR tapes.

EMI superintendents incorporate an EMI membership fee into their professional development budgets for each fiscal year and engage the services of Joan Bates, a grant writer, to search for more ways to finance the course through grants. Joan submits a Goals 2000 grant and receives financial support for EMI to continue trainings.

There is an effort to assemble a structure of EMI trainers, District Leaders, and Diversity Leadership Teams (DLT). As part of this work, each district amasses data on grades, course placements, and scores from standardized tests for all Boston students. Paula Elliott is the research associate working with Dr. Tatum. The EMI Professional Development Committee includes: Richard Schaye, Joan Bates, Marilynne Quarcoo.

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – Credit Course.

1995 – 1996

Dr. Tatum continues to act as an advisor to the Board of Directors. John Saphier decides to withdraw and, in his stead, Andrea Avayzian partners with Dr. Tatum. The EMI program continues to grow and Tatum works with the Instructors Corp.

EMI’s graduate course expands under the Tatum and Avayzian leadership. New instructors are now employed to teach the course as well. The next rendition of the “Anti-Racist” course evolves and it is now offered during both semesters (Fall AND Spring). Instructor teaching teams are as follows: Carroll Blake & Ann Colligan, Naomi Fruitt & Hank Van Putten, Claudia Fox Tree & Jim Kilpatrick, Poppy Milner & Kristan Smith and (don’t know how these are paired, just who is included) Cindy Aguilar, Roouel Belleza, Fred Gross, Robbie Richardson, Martha Matlaw, and Glen Petson. 

Under Dr. Tom Scott’s leadership (Superintendent of Schools in Concord), EMI Superintendents agree that the EMI operation has grown too large to be managed by committee and hire a part time Executive Director to manage EMI. Manuel Fernandez, Wayland’s METCO Director is hired and the System Wide Operations Team (SWOT) is created. Lexington and Lincoln Sudbury join EMI. EMI begins expansion into a full-scale organization. A new District Facilitator position is created to be a liaison between each district and Tatum.

As part of her duties within the grant, Dr. Tatum assumes responsibility for the assumptions and instructional strategies outlined in the course. Facilitators are trained to support EMI graduates and to help initiate district level activities. This Corps, consisting of course instructors and District Facilitators, dialogues on a monthly basis where Tatum provides a support network and introduces many activities and models for change. 

Bimonthly Board meetings continue.  Joan Bates continues to direct the activities of the grant.

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – Credit Course

1996 – Summer

The First Annual Summer Institute, a week long professional development institute, is held in Wellesley for EMI graduates. Many of the concepts are immediately integrated into the evolving EMI anti-racism course. At this point, the 10 districts are contributing $16,000 per district to the EMI budget. Some of these monies funded the Summer Institute, as well as participants paying a nominal ($90?) fee per day. EMI was also only offering 4 courses per year, so there was time to offer enrichment in the summer.

  • Claude Steele discusses “stereotype vulnerability.” 
  • Tracy Tsugawa and Maria (don’t have last name) present Asian American and Latino/a racial identity models, respectively. Multi-racial identity models are also presented. 
  • Phyllis Brown and Deb Habib introduce a multicultural curriculum development framework using the image of a “table of education” based on the work of James Banks and Sonia Nieto. 
  • Skin Deep is shown for the first time, followed by a student panel discussion. 
  • A METCO parent panel discusses, “What were the characteristics of the particular teachers that you and your child considered the most effective and supportive?” 
  • Dr. Gloria Ladson-Billings discusses culturally relevant teaching pedagogy.

Hank Van Putten assumes the Instructional Corps leadership role. The Corps attend their first retreat in Lincoln, MA. Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum discusses the importance of understanding multiple identities in oneself and others. She reviews the cycle of oppression, motivational frameworks, and culturally responsive teaching. She also establishes groundwork for effective facilitation and workshop design.

1996 – 1997

EMI continues to develop as the Board of Directors and Executive Director hire a Coordinator of Budget and Marketing, Dana Stournaras. Dana takes steps to make EMi a formal, non-profit organization with a clear charter, bylaws, and operating procedures for the Board to follow. In this process, the name officially changes to Empowering Multicultural Initiatives.

The Systemwide Operations Team (SWOT) is officially changed to the Operations Team (OT). Organizational structures are strengthened, but questions resurface over whether the mission of EMI should be centered on member district training or on expansion of the organization to become an independent, self-sufficient entity, drawing on revenues from outside sources. This question continues to dominate Board discussion as EMI’s financial stability is weakened by the discontinuation of the Goals 2000 grant. 

EMI holds first summer course for Administrators. Needham Superintendent, Dr. Pat Ruane, is elected Chairperson of the Board of Directors. 

Two new course instructors are trained: Elli Stern and Mike Feldstein.

The mission and vision of EMI is developed:

  • The mission of Empowering Multicultural Initiatives (EMI), a collaborative of educational activists, is to serve as a laboratory for developing and implementing effective anti-racist practices and programs.
  • The vision of Empowering Multicultural Initiatives (EMI) seeks to establish anti-racist school climates that demand high academic achievement from children of color while nurturing the growth and development of all children.

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – Credit Course.

1997 – Summer

The Second Annual Summer Institute is held at Wayland Middle School for EMI graduates. Dr. Jean Wu, LInda Mizel, Victoria Ramirez de Smith, and Christina Chan present on topics of identity and multicultural education. Dr. Ulric Johnson and Debbie Lewis present on “internalized Oppression.” Dr. Karen McLean Donaldson discusses factors and roots of racism. Dr. Tatum returns to offer inspiration and support.

1997 – 1998

Course offerings continue for member districts and business with outside agencies increases. The District Facilitator positions are eliminated, while instructor training and course development expands. EMI hires additional instructors, and the pool of trainers expands under the direction of Mr. Carroll Blake, who is designated as the Training Coordinator. Stipends for DLT members are eliminated. 

Reflecting changes in the METCO student population, and growing research presented in the literature on racism and multicultural education, EMI expands its philosophical base to include strategies for teaching all children of color within a context of “socially just” classrooms. EMI hosts a conference on Affirmative Action hiring. 

In June, Manuel Fernandez resigns to assume the position of Headmaster of the City on the Hill Charter School in Boston. Dana Stouranara is named the Interim Director, with operations centered in Wayland and Needham. Member districts agree to increase membership fees to help offset financial difficulties experienced by the organization.

Around this time, a goal-oriented hiring workshop is offered in Weston to Metro-West Districts (more than just EMI communities)

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – Credit Course.

1998 – Summer

Claudia Fox Tree becomes Coordinator of Curriculum and documents the curriculum in a huge three-ring binder (affectionately called the BAB).

The First Annual Instructor Retreat is held on the Cape. They review the curriculum, books, and new manual, linking anti-racist education to academic achievement, course goals, and instructor expectations. 

Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum’s book, Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria and Other Conversations of Race is adopted as a required reading for the course.

Five new instructors are hired: Veronica Valentine, Jennifer Wolfrum, Tricia O’Reilly, Nicole Stewart, and Paula Martin.

The Third Annual Summer Institute is held in Wayland. Paul Kivel presents on “modern racism” and his book, Uprooting Racism is adopted into the course. Thomas Kochman and Jean Mavrelis present videos and scenarios regarding “cultural patterns and styles.” Dr. Jean Wu discusses anti-racist multicultural curriculum development.

1998 – 1999

Course offerings are cut back in a year of transition. Pat Ruane organizes a transition team to plan the future direction of EMI, with a clear objective of bringing the major understandings acquired from the standard EMI course to curriculum development and instructional planning in member-district classrooms. The transition team shifts focus to increasing the effectiveness of training and service delivery for member districts, with a renewed call to align EMI with statewide curriculum frameworks.

Carroll Blake, Lincoln’s METCO Director, is hired as the new Executive Director and the operation shifts to Lincoln, MA where Mark McQuillan is Superintendent and assumes the role of Chair of the EMI Board.  Belmont Public Schools joins the EMI collaborative.  Training capacity doubles by summer, returning to past levels of services offered to member districts.  EMI offers a summer course to non-member districts, thanks to a grant from Lincoln and the Therese-Filene Foundation.

New Instructor: Carin Rosenberg

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – Credit Course.

1999 – Summer

The Second Annual Instructor Retreat is held in Andover at the Stevens Estate. They discuss and expand the essential areas of the course and further develop the transformed multicultural curriculum lessons. 

Six new instructors are hired: Kelly Cooney, Susan Allen, Sharon Moss, Janis Raguin, Robyn Reese, Cathy Wong, and Adam Blumer.

1999 – 2000

With the operation now centered in Lincoln, Carroll Blake reorganizes the administration and secretarial staff of EMI. Dana Stournaras is made part-time Director of Development. Annette Collins is hired as a full-time Administrative Assistant. Blake and Stournaras structure an arrangement with the EDCO Collaborative to help manage healthcare benefits, bookkeeping, and annual financial audits.  The EMI Board begins preparations for the development of a five-year strategic plan.  Bedford becomes an EMI member.

The first Outstanding Anti-Racist Educator Awards are presented to one individual per district, representing the qualities and achievements toward which EMI is striving. EMI hosts a gala evening. Beverly Daniel-Tatum is the keynote speaker. AWARD RECIPIENTS are: Samantha Fox (Belmont), Cynthia Aguilar (Concord), Jennifer Wolfrum (Lexington), Claudia Fox Tree (Lincoln), Caroline Hand (Lincoln-Sudbury), Helen Sagan (Needham), Hank Van Putten (Newton), Carin Rosenberg (Sudbury), Patricia Scully (Wayland), and Erica Ilyn (Wellesley). 

The course is now offered for Graduate credit through Framingham State College and EMI begins to offer courses in the summer.

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – Credit Course

2000 – Summer

The Third Annual Instructor Retreat is held in Andover. Beverly Daniel-Tatum is a speaker and facilitator. They discuss and develop the Guiding Beliefs, articulating core understandings which guide the course curriculum and EMI philosophy.

Three new instructors are hired: Marti Newkirk, Karen Suyemoto, Dionne McLaughlin 

2000 – 2001

Dana Stournaras is hired as the Acting Executive Director. The roles of Curriculum Coordinator and Training Coordinator are combined to create a new position, Coordinator of Curriculum and Instruction, occupied by Claudia Fox Tree.

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – Credit Course.

2001-2002

Elli Stern becomes Coordinator of Curriculum and Instruction (Claudia “retires” from this role).  Four new instructors are hired: Sujan Talukdar, Pata Suyemoto, Julia Huestis, and Melissa Patrick

John Vogt, from Peoplesworth, is hired by EMI to develop a revised mission statement, goals, and a strategic plan. The new mission is:

  • Empowering Multicultural Initiative is a collaborative of public school districts whose mission is to improve the academic performance of students of color, while nurturing the develop of all children. EMI aims to promote systemic anti-racist practices and culturally-relevant teaching throh staff training and leadership development

Five goals are established

  1. Raise anti-racist awareness
  2. Research best practice s and district performance
  3. Improve instruction and curriculum
  4. Improve system leadership
  5. improve organizational capacity

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – Credit Course.

2002 – Summer

The Fourth Annual Instructor Retreat is held in Andover, MA. Dr. Beverly Daniel-Tatum facilitates a discussion around “expanding the dialogue beyond black and white.”

Seven new instructors are hired: Nicole Feret, Bunny Meyer, Devie Watters, Doug Weinstock, Amy Behrens, and Sophia Kim.

2002 – 2003

Instructors Pata Suyemoto, Carroll Blake, and Paula Marin earn PhD’s from University of Pennsylvania, UMass Boston, and UMass Boston, respectively.  Kalise Jacobs serves as Executive Director when Dr. Blake steps down.

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – Credit Course.
  • Talking About Race and Racism: The Journey Continues (EMI 2) – 3 Credit Course

2003 – Summer

EMI 2 course is piloted by Claudia Fox Tree and Elli Stern focusing on understanding culture and culturally responsive teaching.

New Instructor is hired: Melissa Patrick

2003 – 2004

With departure of Kalise Jacobs, the administration of EMI changes. Doug Weinstock becomes interim Executive Director (half time) and Elli Stern’s position is increased to half time. Elli Stern (18 hours/week) and Doug Weinstock (10 hours/week) serve as Co-Directors.

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – 3 Credit Course.
  • Talking About Race and Racism: The Journey Continues (EMI 2) – 3 Credit Course

2004 – Summer

In an effort to ensure organizational stability, EMI becomes part of the EDCO Collaborative. The governing structure of EMI is changed to an Advisory Council consisting of half METCO Directors and half Superintendents. Maureen LaCroix, Bedford Superintendent, serves as the Chairperson.

The EMI Course for Administrators (24 hours) is piloted with additional seats given to each member district for this course.

2004 – 2005

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – 3 Credit Course.
  • Talking About Race and Racism: The Journey Continues (EMI 2) – 3 Credit Course
  • Multicultural Anti-Racist Curriculum Development and Culturally Relevant Pedagogy – 2 Credit Course
  • Multicultural Anti-Racist Curriculum Development and Culturally Relevant Pedagogy – 2 Credit Course

2005 – 2006

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – 3 Credit Course.
  • Talking About Race and Racism: The Journey Continues (EMI 2) – 3 Credit Course
  • Multicultural Anti-Racist Curriculum Development and Culturally Relevant Pedagogy – 2 Credit Course
  • Multicultural Anti-Racist Curriculum Development and Culturally Relevant Pedagogy – 2 Credit Course

2006 – 2007

The MAALANA Affinity Group for marginalized teachers of color is introduced under the coordination of Claudia Fox Tree.

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – 3 Credit Course.
  • Talking About Race and Racism: The Journey Continues (EMI 2) – 3 Credit Course
  • Multicultural Anti-Racist Curriculum Development and Culturally Relevant Pedagogy – 2 Credit Course
  • Multicultural Anti-Racist Curriculum Development and Culturally Relevant Pedagogy – 2 Credit Course
  • Using Simulation Activities to Understand Culture and Power – 1 Credit Course

2007 – 2008

First EMI “Anti-racist Action Research Course” (48 hours) is offered and called EMI 3. Below are the research topics:

  • Bedford – Jenny Brown, M.Ed., Julie Lane, M.Ed., Erica Fontaine, B. S., Jessica Hart, B.S.
    • English Language Learners: Examining Instructional Practices and Resources That Support Educators of Linguistically Diverse Students
  • Concord – Meg McCann, M.Ed., Lynne Beattie, M.Ed.
    • Examining Perseverance and Resiliency in Low Achieving math Students
  • Wayland – Heather Pineault, Katherine Ganino, Kelly C. Naughton, M.Ed., Karen E. Watson, M.S.    
    • Survey of Existing Mentor Programs in EMI and other METCO districts
  • Multidistrict – Lincoln, Needham, Newton – Claudia A. Fox Tree, M.Ed., Melanie A. Sullivan, M.Ed., Melissa S. Wong, M.Ed., Michael J. Stern, M.S.    
    • I Say, You Say: Student, Parent, and Educator Perceptions of Anti-Racist Teaching Strategies for Students of Color

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – 3 Credit Course.
  • Talking About Race and Racism: The Journey Continues (EMI 2) – 3 Credit Course

2008 – 2009

New instructor: Leslie Smart

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – 3 Credit Course.
  • Talking About Race and Racism: The Journey Continues (EMI 2) – 3 Credit Course

2009 – 2010

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – 3 Credit Course.
  • Talking About Race and Racism: The Journey Continues (EMI 2) – 3 Credit Course

2010 – 2011

EMI revamps membership options and course offerings in order to meet the needs of districts in terms of fiscal realities and to appeal to more educators both within EMI member districts and other districts.  Options for EMI-facilitated student conferences are offered to districts as part of their EMI membership.

The long-standing 36-hour EMI 1 and EMI 2 courses are revised to become 24-hour courses. A variety of 12-hour courses are developed by Claudia Fox Tree and Elli Stern to encompass course content that is dropped (Self-Efficacy, Transforming Curriculum, Multicultural Literature, Closing the Academic Achievement Gap).

Weston Public Schools becomes an EMI member, resulting in 7 member districts (Bedford, Concord/Concord-Carlisle, Needham, Newton, Wayland, Wellesley, Weston).

The EMI Book group is introduced under the coordination of Elli Stern.

The First Annual High School student conference is held. It is offered on a Saturday at Wheelock College. FACT CHECK?

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – 2 Credit Course.
  • Teaching about Native Americans: Avoiding Misconceptions, Stereotypes and Myths – 5 Hour Seminar
  • Strategies for Examining and Addressing the Achievement Gap – 1 Credit Course
  • Difficult Conversations – 1 Credit Course
  • Creating Culturally Proficient Classrooms and Schools – 1 Credit Course
  • Using Multicultural Literature to Affirm Identity – 1 Credit Course
  • Talking About Race and Racism: The Journey Continues (EMI 2) – 3 Credit Course

2011 – 2012

The Second Annual High School student conference is held. It is offered on a Saturday at Wheelock College.

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – Credit Course.
  • Understanding Self Efficacy: Helping Students Do Their Best Work – 1 Credit Course
  • Building Bridges to Understand Race and Culture – 1 Credit Course
  • Transforming Curriculum: Creating Multicultural, Anti-Bias, Culturally Responsive Curriculum – 1 Credit Course
  • Using Multicultural Literature to Affirm Identity – 1 Credit Course
  • What You Didn’t Know You Needed to Know About Native Americans – 1 Credit Course

2012 – 2013

The Third Annual High School student conference is held. It is offered on a Saturday at Wheelock College.

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – Credit Course.
  • Teaching about Native Americans: Avoiding Misconceptions, Stereotypes and Myths – 5 Hour Seminar
  • Strategies for Examining and Addressing the Achievement Gap – 1 Credit Course
  • Understanding Self Efficacy: Helping Students Do Their Best Work – 1 Credit Course
  • Creating Culturally Proficient Classrooms and Schools – 1 Credit Course
  • Building Bridges to Understand Race and Culture – 1 Credit Course
  • Transforming Curriculum: Creating Multicultural, Anti-Bias, Culturally Responsive Curriculum – 1 Credit Course
  • What You Didn’t Know You Needed to Know About Native Americans – 1 Credit Course

2013 – 2014

The Fourth Annual High School student conference is held. It is offered on a Saturday at Wheelock College.

The First Annual Middle School student conference is held. It is offered during the school day.

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – Credit Course.
  • Strategies for Examining and Addressing the Achievement Gap – 1 Credit Course
  • Understanding Self Efficacy: Helping Students Do Their Best Work – 1 Credit Course
  • Creating Culturally Proficient Classrooms and Schools – 1 Credit Course
  • What You Didn’t Know You Needed to Know About Native Americans – 1 Credit Course

Two new instructors are hired:  Johnny Cole and JoAnne Kazis

2014 – Summer

EMI and GBSOCAN merge into IDEAS (Initiatives for Developing Equity and Achievement for Students) – 4 membership options; all beyond “entry” level include course slots and consultation hours; all levels can participate in H.S. and M.S. Student Conferences.

The first Middle School student conference is held. It is offered during the school day. FACT CHECK?

2014 – 2015

Karen Thomsen selected as new program coordinator, starting July 1.

New Instructor: Alison Malkin

The Fifth Annual High School student conference is held. It is offered on a Saturday at the EDCO Collaborative in Bedford, MA.  The Second Annual Middle School student conference is held. It is offered during the school day .

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – 2 Credit Course.
  • Teaching about Native Americans: Avoiding Misconceptions, Stereotypes and Myths – 5 Hour Seminar
  • Strategies for Examining and Addressing the Achievement Gap – 1 Credit Course
  • Understanding Self Efficacy: Helping Students Do Their Best Work – 1 Credit Course
  • Building Bridges to Understand Race and Culture – 1 Credit Course
  • Transforming Curriculum: Creating Multicultural, Anti-Bias, Culturally Responsive Curriculum – 1 Credit Course
  • What You Didn’t Know You Needed to Know About Native Americans – 1 Credit Course
  • Using Simulation Activities to Understand Culture and Power – 1 Credit Course

2015 – 2016

The Sixth Annual High School student conference is held. It is offered on a Saturday at the EDCO Collaborative in Bedford, MA.  The Third Annual Middle School student conference is held at EDCO in Bedford, MA. It is offered during the school day.

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – Credit Course.
  • Understanding Self Efficacy: Helping Students Do Their Best Work – 1 Credit Course

2016 – 2017

There is a concerted effort to put all materials for all courses online electronically for both course participants and for ease of instructor sharing. Hard copies are still available per request.

The White Affinity Group is introduced under the coordination of Karen Thomsen and JoAnne Kazis.  The Fourth Annual Middle School student conference is held at EDCO in Bedford, MA. It is offered during the school day.  The Seventh Annual High School student conference is held on a Saturday at the EDCO Collaborative in Bedford, MA.

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – 2 Credit Course.
  • Strategies for Examining and Addressing the Achievement Gap – 1 Credit Course
  • Understanding Self Efficacy: Helping Students Do Their Best Work – 1 Credit Course
  • Building Bridges to Understand Race and Culture – 1 Credit Course

2017 – Summer 

After a 16 year hiatus (last one in 2002), the Fifth Instructor Retreat is held at EDCO in Bedford, MA with facilitator Gene Thompson-Grove as the facilitator.

Claudia Fox Tree and Jennifer Wolfrum conduct trainings for the entire staff of  Wayside Youth and Family Services throughout the summer. The focus is on using guidelines for difficult conversations, reflecting on identity, and beginning to understand the systemic nature of privilege (left hand/right hand).

Two new instructors are hired: Ed Walker and Jen Dirga

2017 – 2018

The Fifth Annual Middle School student conference is held at EDCO in Bedford, MA. It is offered during the school day.

Courses taught this year include:

  • Anti-Racist Teaching and Effective Classroom Practices for All Students (EMI 1) – 2 Credit Course.
  • Teaching about Native Americans: Avoiding Misconceptions, Stereotypes and Myths – 5 Hour Seminar
  • Affinity Groups: Challenging Micro-Aggressions – 5 Hour Seminar
  • Building Bridges: Facilitating Courageous Conversation with Students – 1 Credit Course
  • Strategies for Examining and Addressing the Achievement Gap – 1 Credit Course
  • Understanding Self Efficacy: Helping Students Do Their Best Work – 1 Credit Course

Two new instructors are hired: Caroline Han and Ed Byrne

First Annual IDEAS Professional Conference celebrating 30 years is held on April 7 at the Bentley Conference Center. Dr. Beverly Daniel-Tatum returns as keynote speaker. She has a book signing for the re-released version of her books. The conference sells out its 250 capacity.

2021

With EDCO disolving, IDEAS finds a new home under the Massachusetts Association of School Superintendents (M.A.S.S.)



 

 

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